Paper - Refereed

The notion of reusable, flexible, learning resources delivered digitally has for some years held appeal for educators and those involved in the design of learning environments (Ip & Morrison, 2001). The capacity to organise and structure learning materials in a manner which targets the specific learning needs of groups and individuals has been shown to optimise learning potential (BECTA, 2005), and increasingly the digital medium is being used to achieve this, through the development of niche software applications known as digital learning objects (DLOs).
A search of book publications revealed that few refer to Australian and New Zealand ICT initiatives in schools. Consequently, pre-service teachers and practising teachers in Australian Universities and schools are largely restricted to the study of initiatives undertaken elsewhere. Apart from some presence in Journals and Conference Proceedings, there is a silence in terms of telling Australian ICT stories in book publications.
Teachers are exhorted to integrate, or preferably make integral, ICT in their teaching. Teacher education programs have the responsibility to graduate teachers who are confident and competent in using ICTs in their professional lives. To impact on the classrooms of tomorrow teacher preparation programs need to develop entire programs where ICTs are integral to the teaching and learning processes.
This paper draws on research from a larger national SiMERR (Centre for Science, ICT, Mathematics Education for Rural and Regional Australia) project for
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